Awards

Ideas Unlimited Awards

For years teachers have been exchanging classroom and teaching ideas. This is what keeps the agricultural education programs alive and teachers enthusiastic. The NAAE Ideas Unlimited Award recognizes teachers for developing and sharing innovative ideas with their colleges nationwide.

Each recipient received a plaque and a cash award to attend the annual conference in Kansas City. Delmar Thomson Learning sponsored this award.

Region I
Jim Clifton
Selah High School
Selah, Washingon
Region IV
Amanda Johnson
Dansville Schools
Dansville, Michigan
Region II
Jerry Schmidt
Minneapolis High School
Minneapolis, Kansas
Region V
Joe Green
Pope High School
Marietta, Georgia
Region III
Dave Olson
Boone Central Schools
Albion, Nebraska
Region VI
Sally Shomo
Beverley Manor Middle School
Staunton, Virginia

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Region I
Jim Clifton
Selah High School
Selah, Washingon

Because of his students' excitement about the television program "Junkyard Wars," Clifton, the agricultural teacher at Selah High School in Washington, developed a project referred to as "Barnyard Wars" for his agricultural mechanics class. The students are expected to use teamwork to design and build a product guided by specific parameters. "Barnyard Wars" was created into a career development event (CDE) to help the students utilize shop skills learned throughout the year. The objective, timeline, materials available, parameters and rules were mailed to participating schools before the scheduled contest. The products were judged based upon the planning process and end product.

Through the project, students enhance their mathematical skills through measuring, reasoning and communicating mathematically. They also gain science skills, such as the properties of steel, its different shapes and metallurgy.

For more information about this innovative idea contact Jim Clifton at Selah High School at (509) 697-7934 or by email at jimclifton@selah.k12.wa.us.

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Region II

Jerry Schmidt
Minneapolis High School
Minneapolis, Kansas

Jerry Schmidt, the agricultural teacher at Minneapolis High School in Minneapolis, Kansas, created a four-feet long, three-feet tall and one-foot wide wooden cow that the program has used in a variety of activities for a cost of only $50.00. Schmidt created the cow by projecting an image onto a piece of particleboard. He then cut the image out and painted it to look like a dairy cow. For the udder, he used a strawberry bucket and replacement teats from nipple buckets.

The Minneapolis FFA Chapter uses the cow at the Ottawa County Fair Kiddy Barnyard to teach the children about the dairy industry. A local dairy farmer provides the chapter with a bucket of milk, and children are able to practice milking while sitting on a wooden milk stool. Schmidt has also exhibited the cow at the Kansas State Fair where hundreds of children practiced milking. He plans on using the cow in his animal science class to help teach about the digestive system using a poster attached to the side of the cow.

For more information about this innovative idea contact Jerry Schmidt at Minneapolis High School at 785.392.2113 or by e-mail at jschmidt@usd239.org

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Region III
Dave Olson
Boone Central Schools
Albion, Nebraska

To help his students comprehend the anatomy of bovine without causing harm or stress to a living animal, Dave Olson, the agriculture teacher at Boone Central Schools in Albion, Nebraska, created a model of a cow with his veterinary science class.

Class members collected skeletal structures found in area pastures and used the bones to design the cow. A balloon, sheet of tag board, wire, masking tape and sawdust were used to create the reproductive tract. Students cut a piece of particleboard to resemble the shape of a cow's torso to place the reproductive tract on. One side of the board was painted to appear like the outside of a cow, and the other side was painted like the skeletal structure and digestive tract with an actual pelvic bone attached.

Olson's students are now able to visualize the skeletal structure, digestive system and reproductive system better with the model. Students can also practice palpation and artificial insemination with the cow.

For more information about this innovative idea contact Dave Olson at Boone Central at 402.395.2134 or by e-mail at dolson@esu7.org

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Region IV
Amanda Johnson
Dansville Schools
Dansville, Michigan

Serving as the agriscience teacher and FFA advisor for Dansville Schools, Johnson uses a variety of lessons to teach her students. One of the more creative lessons that she teaches is named "How Trashy are You?" This lesson provides students with the opportunity to visually determine the amount of trash the average teenager produces in a 24-hour period.

Johnson asks her students to first create a hypothesis about how much garbage they dispose of in a given day and how much it weighs in grams. The students are then provided with their own garbage dump or plastic garbage bag. They are required to carry their dump wherever they go for 24-hours and place all garbage in the dump. After 24-hours, the students weigh the dump, list the contents of their garbage and discuss common materials disposed of.

For more information about this innovative idea contact Amanda Johnson at Dansville Schools at 517.623.6120 or by email at dansvilleag@yahoo.com.

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Region V
Joe Green
Pope High School
Marietta, Georgia

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As the horticulture teacher at Pope High School in Marietta, Georgia, Joe Green has implemented a program referred to as "The Boogie Bucks Scorecard" in his classroom. Green created a scorecard that lists a range of academic and laboratory activities and an assigned point value for each. He provides each student with a scorecard and generally two weeks to complete the list of assignments. The goal for the students is to earn 1,000 Boogie Bucks or points for an A+. Once the students have earned some bucks, they are ready to "boogie."

"The basic principle for the success of the Boogie Bucks Scorecard is that it creates a self motivation in the student to complete a series of diverse assignments in a given period," said Green. "It also puts a higher responsibility of record keeping on the student."

For more information about this innovative idea contact Joe Green at Pope High School by phone at 770.578.7900 or by email at joe.green@cobbk12.org

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Region VI
Sally Shomo
Beverley Manor Middle School
Staunton, Virginia

As an agricultural education teacher at Beverley Manor Middle School in Staunton, Virginia, Shomo often searches for new ideas to excite her students to learn. To encourage FFA members to become active in the local chapter, Shomo has started the FFA Bucks auction program.

"FFA Bucks" is play money that members earn by participating in FFA activities and chapter fundraisers. The students may begin collecting FFA Bucks in August each year and continue to collect until the auction is held in May. Parents and community businesses are asked to donate items to sell at the auction, such as hats, T-shirts, model tractors or candy. Auction items are displayed for bidders to see and an auctioneer and clerks help run the event.

"The FFA auction is easy to plan and is a wonderful public relations tool for the chapter and community," said Shomo. "This is an excellent way to not only get students involved in your program but also parents and the community."

For more information about this innovative idea contact Sally Shomo at Beverley Manor High School by phone at 540.885.5806 or by email at sshomo@augusta.k12.va.us.

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